Tag Archives: stories

You Just Never Know. Sometimes Good Luck Shows Up Disguised as Bad Luck

9 Sep

Good luck disguised as bad luck?

The other day I found myself in a discussion about bad luck. A friend was talking about how sometimes it feels like things go against us and that we have a string of bad luck that makes things look less than hopeful.   I asked my friend if they had ever considered that sometimes good luck comes to us disguised as bad luck.  Sometimes, if we are patient, we will see that we were actually being saved from a far greater trial.

It made me think of a story I heard once, told to me as a Taoist tale.  I went to the internet to see if I could find it in order to share it here.  I found many different versions of the story and actually like this very American version.

As the story goes, there was once a farmer and his only son in the days just  before the Civil War. Having only one horse, the farmer and son worked long hard  days, sun up to sun down, just to get by, with nothing left to spare.

One day as the father and son plowed the fields, their horse got spooked and  ran off. The son was devastated; “What bad luck, now what will we do?”

The father replied; “Good luck, bad luck, too soon to tell.”

The father and son continued to work the farm. Then one day their horse comes  running back over the hill with 6 other horses. The son exclaimed, “What great  luck, now we have all the horses we’ll ever need!”

To which the farmer replied; “Good luck, bad luck, too soon to tell.”

The next day as the farmer and son were working with the horses, one  particularly difficult horse threw the son off his back and  broke his leg. The  son cried: “Oh father, I am so sorry, now you have to work the farm all by  yourself. What bad luck!”

Once again the father replied: “Good luck, bad luck, too soon to tell.”

Several days later the Civil War broke out and all the able-bodied young men  were sent off to war. The farmer’s son, having a broken leg, was forced to stay  at home.

After the leg had healed, the father had the only farm around with a son to  help and seven horses to boot. They worked the farm and prospered.

Good luck, bad luck. It’s too soon to tell.

Perhaps.

Good luck,  bad luck. It’s all in how you look at it.

Getting closer.

Good luck, bad luck. Depends on which one you choose and what you make of  it.

Bingo. Absolutely. Now you got it!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/66578

http://ezinearticles.com/?Motivation:-Good-Luck-or-Bad-Luck,-Too-Soon-to-Tell&id=66578

Photo credit:

http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Alphanumeric_Charact_g414-Number_13_Made_In_Daisy_Flower_p93099.html

Many times we are so busy focusing on what we have lost that we are unable to receive what it has allowed us to gain.

There is a nice short discussion you might enjoy that follows the story, just click the first link above to check it out.

Do you have a story about something that appeared to be bad luck that actually turned out to be a wonderful gift?

A Story Of Two Monks

5 Aug

Photo credit   http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Religion_g302-Thai_Monks_p37604.html

Recently I read a post through freshly pressed (I love freshly pressed) on 258 Days ’til 40: The Toll We Pay (For NOT Letting Go).   It is  about forgiveness and how it is really for the benefit of the one forgiving rather than the one forgiven.   She noted one of my favorite quotes “Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.” (not really sure who first said this ),  and talks about releasing your anger and hurt and moving on to create a beautiful, peaceful future for yourself. It was thought provoking and reminded me of a story about two monks.

The story goes something like this.   Two monks are walking near a river and happen upon a woman who needs cross the river to get to her family. The woman can’t swim and is terrified that she will drown if she tries to cross the river. The first monk listens to the woman’s fears and says, then I will carry you across.  The second monk looks at the first monk sternly and reminds him that they are forbidden to touch women.  But  the  first monk decides that he is willing to go against the prohibition in order to help the women cross the river safely so that she can be with her family.   The first monk picks the woman up and carries her across the river to safety.  The other monk looked on disapprovingly.

The monks resumed their journey and as the day went on the second monk continued his disapproving comments toward the first monk regarding his carrying the woman across the river.  Finally, at  the end of the day the first monk turns to the second monk and says, you know I put the woman down hours ago at the river’s edge, but you are still carrying her.

I know that this is a hard-won lesson as many people  are taught that holding on to hurt and pain is a form of protection from or power over others.  They do not see it for the poison that it is and choose to continue to drink it.  This brings to mind another quote to think about if If you absolutely must feel that you are getting “revenge” for a wrong done to you.   “Living well is the best revenge”.  George Herbert

Do you have a way that helps you to forgive others and/or yourself?  I would love to hear about it.