Why is Escrow Asking Me for Personal Information and What Should I Do About It?

26 Jun

Transaction Tuesday

Image courtesy of smarnad/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Why is escrow asking me for personal information and what should I do about it?

These days we all know that we should never give out any of our personal information unless we know exactly who is getting it and exactly why they need it so this is a question that often comes up during the escrow process.  The reason for this is a little piece of paper that seller’s are given to fill out by the escrow officer called the Statement of  Information.

This form is actually used by your title company to distinguish the buyers and sellers of real property from other people with similar names when searching public records for judgments, liens, court decrees, bankruptcies or other matters.

If you fail to provide the Statement of information, your title company will have to add exclusions to the policy that list as exceptions from coverage judgments, liens or other matters which may affect the property to be insured.  These exclusions or exceptions are not allowed by lenders.  Lenders will require that the title is insured, so without this Statement of Information being submitted in a timely manner you might  find that your closing could be delayed.

Just another tip to help your transaction go smoothly to closing.  Remember, feel free to call me if you have a question about real estate.

 

See you in the neighborhood,

Karen Urata

Century 21 Award

uratakaren@yahoo.com

(760) 609-0952

DRE License # 01720025

Winner 5-Star Award San Diego Magazine  -2010, 2011, 2012

Lemon Cheesecake Ice Cream

19 Dec

queenoffamilosity:

This is enough to convince me to break out the ice cream maker.

Originally posted on Homemade With Mess:

I think I say this every time I make ice cream but this is quite possibly the best ice cream I have ever tasted. Maybe it’s because at the time of eating there is nothing to directly compare it too; but I’m in no way exaggerating by saying that when you put this ice cream in your mouth, at that precise moment in time it is quite frankly the best thing on Earth and thoughts of any past ice cream obsessions fly right out the window. This ice cream requires nothing more than a spoon, so just sit back, relax and enjoy!

as 037

  • 175ml full fat milk
  • 200g caster sugar
  • 125g cream cheese
  • 1 tsp good quality vanilla extract
  • 1 large egg plus 1 egg yolk
  • Rind of 1 lemon and juice of half
  • 350ml double cream – lightly whipped
  • 50g dark chocolate digestives – smashed into crumbs with a rolling…

View original 98 more words

About Onions, Folklore, Facts, and French

26 Jan

Onions

It is a rainy day in sunny Southern California and that makes me think about warm and comfy food. Amazingly, French Onion Soup keeps popping up into
my mind. The funny thing about French onion soup is that I haven’t always had such warm a fuzzy thoughts regarding it. As a matter of fact, my 8 yr old self didn’t want any part of it. I can remember having a terrible cold and my father, (who of course I idolized, I was daddy’s little girl), who I would make
great efforts to please, announced that onion had medicinal qualities and that some onion soup would be just the thing.

I decided that this was the time to draw a line in the sand and not one drop of the magic elixir passed my lips. However, my mumble, mumble, let’s just say older self does not agree. I guess that I am not alone in this change of heart toward the onion as I remember reading once, on the magazine they give you in the pocket of the seat in front of you on the plane, that in the US we consume approx 20 lbs of onions a year per person! That translates into 450 semi- truckloads of onions, at least that is what the National Onion Association says on their website http://onions-usa.org/all-about-onions/consumption.

The reason that this little-known fact stuck with me is because I read this while on my way home from visiting my mother for Mother’s Day where we had prepared a surprise brunch for the entire family that included, you guessed it, French Onion Soup along with Tortilla Soup, Waldorf Salad, and Caesar Salad.

All this came to mind recently as I read a post that talks about the folklore or maybe even an urban legend, surrounding onions and their medicinal properties. It is an interesting read especially since it is flu season. You can check it out here http://markraysolar.wordpress.com/ and decide how much is true and how much is wishful thinking.

For those of you who would like to try a little French Onion Soup right now, either because you love it or because you want to test my father’s theory, I have included this recipe that I found at http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/french_onion_soup/.

It is easy and well worth the time that it takes to create this golden brown treat and is much more cost-effective than ordering it in a restaurant. The secret here is to cook the onions to a golden brown, slowly, to help them release their sweetness. If you or those you are preparing this soup for have gluten-intolerance I suggest that you substitute Glutino Bagel Chips for the cruton of French bread , baguette, traditionally used to help support the melted golden cheese that rests on top. Or, you can do without it if you do not mind the possibility that the cheese might sink a bit.

Ingredients:

6 large red or yellow onions (I prefer yellow)

Olive oil

1/4 teaspoon pf sugar

2 cloves garlic, minced

8 cups of beef stock or chicken stock (I prefer beef), or a combination of the two (traditioanlly the soup is made with beef stock)

1/2 cup of dry vermouth or dry white wine (I prefer white wine)

1 bay leaf

1/4 teaspoon of dry thyme

salt and pepper

8 slices of toasted French bread (I prefer Glutino gluten-free bagel chips, no need to toast, for me, baguette for others)

1  1/2 cups of grated swiss Gruyere with a little grated Parmesan cheese ) I prefer very thin slices and sometimes use Muenster cheese)

Method

In a large saucepan, saute the onions in the olive oil on mendium high heat until well-browned, but not burned, about 30-40 minutes )or longer).  Add the sugar about 10 minutes into the process to help with the caramelization.

Onions cooking

Add the garlic and saute for 1 minute.  Add the stock, vermouth or wine, bay leaf, and thyme.  Cover partially and simmer until the flavors are well blended, about 30 minutes.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Discard the bay leaf.

onion soup pot

To serve you can either use individual oven-proof soup bowls of one large casserole dish (I prefer paper cups if the meal is informal and finish in the microwave making clean up easy).  Ladle the soup into the bowls of casserole dish.  Put in the broiler for 10 minutes at 350 degrees F, or until the cheese bubbles and is slightly browned (if you use the microwave removes when cheese melts, it will not brown).  Serve immediately.

onion soup cup

10 Jan

queenoffamilosity:

I could not resist sharing this post, from a favorite blogger, about writing…and so much more. Hope you enjoy it as much as did.

Originally posted on Courage 2 Create:

I was lying down the other day, thinking about this: the past is truly past.

Whatever upsets you about the past, if you just ruminate on the fact that this past event is truly over now, you might feel some relief almost immediately. This is because you’ll realize that the past doesn’t exist in any living, breathing, “organic” way today.

True: the past has left its footprints (and its misguided pathways) but the past itself is no longer here.

All you have is the present; and the present tense, as you well know, is the most urgent and exciting of all the tenses.

Past, Present, And Future Tenses

If an author chooses to tell his character’s story in the past sense, his character is immediately disempowered: she’s forced to live out a story that has already happened. Her fate is sealed and nothing can be changed. This is because…

View original 1,065 more words

We’re All On a Mission, But What Is It?

20 Nov

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominic / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

It seems that we are all on a mission in life, but many of us don’t really know what that mission really is.  That is not a critical statement, just an observation.  I know this because I sometimes find myself asking the question that we all ask at one time or another,  “What the heck am I doing here.”

If you are like me you have likely asked this question more than once while dancing through the fog of child rearing.  I have actually wondered what it would be like if parents made a mission statement much like businesses, organizations, and even bloggers do to help focus and measure their direction.

I thought I would look around on the blogosphere and see if their was anyone else thinking about this and I found a wonderful description of why a mission statement for this purpose can make sense.  This link will get you to the blog that the quote that follows is taken from.  (I haven’t discovered yet  how to create a clip that links back to the original blog.  If any of you techies out there feel like doing your random act of kindness for today you could drop me a note about how it is done.)  http://mirajyoga.wordpress.com/2012/10/22/3-steps-to-discovering-your-lifes-mission/

“Your mission statement is there to give your actions a certain intention–an intention that emerged from a state of awareness and consciousness.  We know that we often act out of conditioned and learned behaviors and patterns that aren’t necessarily aligned with what we’re really about.”

That sounds familiar.  You wake up one day and wonder which day it was that you turned into your mother. Your thoughts spinning with “What did I just do?  My mother used to do that to me and I hated it.”  But really, what else do you know to do?  As they say in the military, when you are in a crisis, you fall back on your training.  For some of us that may not be in line with the direction we want to take with our children.

Most mission statements contain a goal as well as statements the guiding principles you will follow to get there.  So it seems that identifying your goal is the first step.   So you might say your mission is to raise responsible, loving children (or whatever your goal is).  Then you might say, through establishing appropriate boundaries, engaging with my children throughout the day, and showing that I love them even when we disagree.

But here comes the hard part, how are we going to accomplish this?  Kids don’t come with manuals and parents don’t always come with full toolboxes.  The funny thing is that the act of writing this down often begins the process of opening the path to discovering tools that can be helpful to accomplish your goal.  Once you have written down the idea that you want to establish, for example, appropriate boundaries, it becomes easy to start out on a journey to find new ways to do this.  You can start right here on WordPress.  Two wonderful resources that I have found here are Help4YourFamily http://help4yourfamily.com/2012/11/19/parent-affirmation-monday-empathic-11172012/ and Let Life In Practices http://letlifeinpractices.com/2012/04/16/9-ways-to-tell-your-children-that-you-love-them/#more-568 .

What little jewel of a technique, practice, or attitude have you found (and where did you find them) that has made a difference for your children, or for that matter any of your relationships?  Do share because I still have plenty of room in my toolbox to fill.

11 Sep

Had to reblog this. Couldn’t have said it better myself.

You Just Never Know. Sometimes Good Luck Shows Up Disguised as Bad Luck

9 Sep

Good luck disguised as bad luck?

The other day I found myself in a discussion about bad luck. A friend was talking about how sometimes it feels like things go against us and that we have a string of bad luck that makes things look less than hopeful.   I asked my friend if they had ever considered that sometimes good luck comes to us disguised as bad luck.  Sometimes, if we are patient, we will see that we were actually being saved from a far greater trial.

It made me think of a story I heard once, told to me as a Taoist tale.  I went to the internet to see if I could find it in order to share it here.  I found many different versions of the story and actually like this very American version.

As the story goes, there was once a farmer and his only son in the days just  before the Civil War. Having only one horse, the farmer and son worked long hard  days, sun up to sun down, just to get by, with nothing left to spare.

One day as the father and son plowed the fields, their horse got spooked and  ran off. The son was devastated; “What bad luck, now what will we do?”

The father replied; “Good luck, bad luck, too soon to tell.”

The father and son continued to work the farm. Then one day their horse comes  running back over the hill with 6 other horses. The son exclaimed, “What great  luck, now we have all the horses we’ll ever need!”

To which the farmer replied; “Good luck, bad luck, too soon to tell.”

The next day as the farmer and son were working with the horses, one  particularly difficult horse threw the son off his back and  broke his leg. The  son cried: “Oh father, I am so sorry, now you have to work the farm all by  yourself. What bad luck!”

Once again the father replied: “Good luck, bad luck, too soon to tell.”

Several days later the Civil War broke out and all the able-bodied young men  were sent off to war. The farmer’s son, having a broken leg, was forced to stay  at home.

After the leg had healed, the father had the only farm around with a son to  help and seven horses to boot. They worked the farm and prospered.

Good luck, bad luck. It’s too soon to tell.

Perhaps.

Good luck,  bad luck. It’s all in how you look at it.

Getting closer.

Good luck, bad luck. Depends on which one you choose and what you make of  it.

Bingo. Absolutely. Now you got it!

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/66578

http://ezinearticles.com/?Motivation:-Good-Luck-or-Bad-Luck,-Too-Soon-to-Tell&id=66578

Photo credit:

http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Alphanumeric_Charact_g414-Number_13_Made_In_Daisy_Flower_p93099.html

Many times we are so busy focusing on what we have lost that we are unable to receive what it has allowed us to gain.

There is a nice short discussion you might enjoy that follows the story, just click the first link above to check it out.

Do you have a story about something that appeared to be bad luck that actually turned out to be a wonderful gift?

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